CEREC®

CEREC® is a method used by thousands of dentists worldwide since 1987 not only to replace these fillings, but also to restore any tooth that is decayed, weakened, broken, etc.

We select a ceramic block that matches the shade of the tooth being repaired. We then insert the block into the Milling Unit. The data from the Acquisition Unit is used to direct two diamond coated burs to carve the block into the indicated shape of the restoration. This process usually takes 8 to 18 minutes depending on the size and type of restoration. After the milling is finished, your dentist polishes the finished filling or crown and bonds it into place.

Cerec

CEREC® is a method used by thousands of dentists worldwide since 1987 not only to replace these fillings, but also to restore any tooth that is decayed, weakened, broken, etc.

We select a ceramic block that matches the shade of the tooth being repaired. We then insert the block into the Milling Unit. The data from the Acquisition Unit is used to direct two diamond coated burs to carve the block into the indicated shape of the restoration. This process usually takes 8 to 18 minutes depending on the size and type of restoration. After the milling is finished, your dentist polishes the finished filling or crown and bonds it into place.

Intraoral Cameras

Designed to allow clinicians to capture and display digital images from inside a patient’s mouth, intraoral cameras are a valuable tool for patient education and case documentation. Shaped like a small wand, many dental intraoral cameras are highly portable and easily connect to a computer wirelessly, via USB or via a docking station. Most commonly equipped with LEDs, these digital cameras can capture images without the need for external lighting.

Patients do not always accept treatment they cannot understand, but an intraoral camera allows them to see what you see. A problem such as a fractured tooth can be easier to spot and impossible to ignore when it is magnified on a computer monitor or TV screen. While designed for intraoral imaging, some cameras also can capture extraoral full face images for patient records

Intraoral Cameras

Designed to allow clinicians to capture and display digital images from inside a patient’s mouth, intraoral cameras are a valuable tool for patient education and case documentation. Shaped like a small wand, many dental intraoral cameras are highly portable and easily connect to a computer wirelessly, via USB or via a docking station. Most commonly equipped with LEDs, these digital cameras can capture images without the need for external lighting.

Patients do not always accept treatment they cannot understand, but an intraoral camera allows them to see what you see. A problem such as a fractured tooth can be easier to spot and impossible to ignore when it is magnified on a computer monitor or TV screen. While designed for intraoral imaging, some cameras also can capture extraoral full face images for patient records

Cone Beam 3-D Imaging

We’re big believers in investing in technology that will ensure you have comfortable visit while reaching your oral health goals. That’s why we offer panoramic x-rays and cone-beam 3D imaging right here in the comfort of our 68th Street office. Cone beam 3D imaging is a relatively new development that allows dentists to see clear, detailed, three dimensional images of your teeth, as well as the bones and soft tissues that surround them.

It’s called a cone-beam because the x-ray beam is literally in the shape of a cone, where traditional CT scans use fan shaped x-ray beams. This cone-shaped beam takes nearly 600 of  “slices” of information about your mouth, and then special software assembles all of this into three-dimensional views.

Cone Beam 3D Imaging

We’re big believers in investing in technology that will ensure you have comfortable visit while reaching your oral health goals. That’s why we offer panoramic x-rays and cone-beam 3D imaging right here in the comfort of our 68th Street office. Cone beam 3D imaging is a relatively new development that allows dentists to see clear, detailed, three dimensional images of your teeth, as well as the bones and soft tissues that surround them.

It’s called a cone-beam because the x-ray beam is literally in the shape of a cone, where traditional CT scans use fan shaped x-ray beams. This cone-shaped beam takes nearly 600 of  “slices” of information about your mouth, and then special software assembles all of this into three-dimensional views.


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